There are 7-day season tickets, but why there are no 5-working day season tickets?

This might seem like a simple question, but I have always wondered why we have to buy 7-day season tickets, whilst the majority of commuters only use them to travel between Monday to Friday?

I mean, I don't need to buy those 2 extra days, which only makes tickets unnecessarily more expensive.  

Implementing this wouldn't require changing the gates (given that they read a start date and an end date). It will be just the matter of adding that option in the vending machines and in the website. 

For a start, this type of tickets would only make sense to buy them on Monday or a Tuesday, it will still be cheaper than buying a 7-day season ticket. 

Of course, the real treat would be that the price-per-day should remain equivalent to the 7-day season ticket, that is, if the 7-day ticket is  £30, so the price per day is £4.28, the 5-working day ticket should be 5 x 4.28 = £21.40. Fantastic saving!!

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  • The SWR ticket sale webpage allows buying season tickets with a validity of 1 month or more (even setting a custom start date and end date), but it has to be for more than one month.

    I find that odd, given that there is no technical reason I can think of that would avoid it (in the understanding that the gates work as described in this forum message: forum.southwesternrailway.com/.../flexible-season-tickets-for-part-time-commuters ),

    In fact, this could be a good temporary measure to create a pseudo-flexible season ticket (given that the real thing is taking forever).

    Here the key issue is the price (of course). Should the price per day remain the same as in the 7-day ticket? That seems a bit unfair to the customer. Should the price per day remain as in the monthly ticket? That would be great, but maybe unfair to those who will still buy the 7-day season. Also, the company might find that that uneconomical. 

    So, here's a suggestion of how it could work:

    •  the 7-day season ticket between A and B costs £30, and the monthly season ticket costs £115 (an example suspiciously similar to the commute between Southampton and Winchester).
    • The price per day for the 7-day ticket is 30 / 7 = £4.28, and the price per day on the monthly is 115/ 30 = £3.83; the difference between both is £0.45 per day (assuming 30 days per month)
    • If the customer buys a season ticket for a number of days between 7 and 30, the price would be such that reflects a linear progression between both reference prices: the more days covered by the ticket, the price per day decreases and gets closer to the monthly one. 

    I've done the maths, and will provide a much-welcomed saving, with very little effort for the company. 

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